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Use the form on the right to contact us. Alternately, you may send an email to inquiry (at) cherrylaurelstudio.com and we will respond as quickly as we can.

Or, give us a call at 404.667.9570.

Thanks so much!

PO Box 85
Decatur, GA 30031

404-667-9570

Cherry Laurel Studio is a southern design and letterpress studio based in Decatur, GA. Think hospitality. Attention to detail. Think a little southern comfort (the yes ma’am and the mixer) splashed into the work. 

Blog

Puzzle Pieces

Elizabeth Kotz

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My beloved Nikon had a little accident this weekend. Wherein I tried to grab the camera off of the counter to put it safely away and out of potential harm's reach—and instead the strap snagged on a cabinet knob and the whole thing came crashing down. Smashed. Lens and body broken. Hopefully not beyond repair, but pretty damaged nonetheless. We use this Nikon to shoot all of our still and video images, both for process imagery and for product shots. And for client work, such as the annual report I'll be shooting for a client in the next week or so. Heartbroken, to say the least. Bummer.

Focusing on happy things, one of our projects for this year is to get our type organized a lot better. It's a little haphazard these days, both from the way we inherited the cabinets and from a little carefree use along our path to Now.

To that goal, I bought five more type drawers on Ebay this morning. I know I've bought a couple of fonts that have been sitting sadly in their original shipping materials, and can't imagine we won't stumble on some doubled up treasures in the existing collection. We have a beautiful California Job Case poster from the gals at Pioneer House up in Knoxville, TN that will be put to good use as a guide to make sure we're minding our Ps and Qs correctly. 

To the unfamiliar eye, the California style of organization looks a little haphazard. There is a method to that madness, though! The idea was to keep more frequently used letters closer to the typesetter to increase speed. It's our understanding that "back in the day" they used to hold typesetting contests in the park, to see who could set a form faster. Much like today's pie eating contests, n'est ce pas? 

Tying it all in, Happy Pi(e) day!